Self-Promotion for Artists: More Than a Necessary Evil (Part 2)

Basic tactics of self-promotion can be learned, but artists need to be motivated to learn them. A preliminary step toward motivation is to abandon anti-promotion attitudes and realize that art promotion, if done correctly, is hardly the same as peddling consumer goods. It can be an enriching experience, the means or process of which is just as valuable as its ends (success); it doesn’t have to be painful or artless.

Another factor that might move artists to embrace self-promotion is the realization that it’s essentially a means of shaping their destiny; everything a creative person does with regard to their work reflects upon their future. Promotion means interacting with                       the public, producing a friction between the interior world that initiates a creative work and the exterior world. This friction gives promotion a frisson of tension and excitement; its consequences are unpredictable, and no matter how carefully it is planned, no one really knows where it will actually lead or precisely what its effects will be. It may open other opportunities or reveal undreamed of possibilities. Or it may backfire and reveal harsh truths. An artist must capitalize on the results, whatever they may be, and adapt to the destiny they reveal, just as he/she does in the course of his/her artistic life. Self-promotion is taking your fate in your own hands; it is an active, deliberate effort to make a mark and impose your creative vision on the world.

Copyright © 2009 by Adam Eisenstat

Adam Eisenstat is a professional writer with extensive experience writing for artists (artist statements, bios, grant essays, etc.). To learn more about how Adam can help you create powerful written communications that will advance your work, contact him at: adameisenstat@aol.com or visit his online portfolio at www.mediabistro.com/AdamEisenstat.

Adam Eisenstat

917.282.8949

adameisenstat@aol.com

Promoting your art or your art website

It is very hard for any website to get rankings and traffic in today’s competitive market. Unless you run a super-niche website with few competing websites, the chances are you face a minimum of 12 months from launch to start seeing any real traffic.

Getting links into your site and also having lots of pages linked together on your own website are very important. One of the ways you can encourage cross linking is to build some form of application that users will use to benefit themselves. A recently relaunch of an old established site has done just this – www.oilpaintingsonline.com has created a facility or artists to create their own gallery, which are then public on the site for others to see (which creates site-cross linking) and also they can share their gallery by creating a Facebook or Myspace plug-in. This is really neat as it will provide some great inbound links to the site from users own micros sites

If you are an artist struggling to sell art online, you should scout around and take a look at these sort of feature s- several free online galleries have the ability for you to post and promote your art at no cost at all.

This article was provided to Simple Art Marketing by Boden O’Brien

Self-Promotion for Artists: More Than a Necessary Evil (Part 1) By Adam Eisenstat

If a tree falls in the forest and no one writes a press release about it, does it make a sound? By the same token, if an artist creates a work and no one else experiences it, does it have any artistic impact? Is it a viable creation? The act of creation guarantees only that a work will come into existence, but this is an incomplete equation without the presence of an audience. Whenever you hear an artist say that he/she creates “just for myself,” don’t believe it. Everyone knows that the audience isn’t secondary to the artistic process — it’s a crucial, necessary component. An audience, however, does not come into being on its own; there’s an intermediary step between creating art and the formation of an audience. That step is promotion.

Many fine artists regard self-promotion as a base activity that is at odds with the creative process. In the extreme, they see it as dubious and sleazy, a mercenary endeavor that can only corrupt the purity of their vision. At best, it is a necessary evil that is totally divorced from the real business of making art. This attitude is increasingly unrealistic and burdened with the quaint notion of the artist as a gifted exile in a pristine realm, completely insulated from the world at large. More importantly, this attitude can be fatal to artists’ careers and may preclude them from realizing even the most basic level of success.

Artists are often reluctant to thrust themselves and their work into the arena of self-promotion. If they don’t harbor the prejudice that self-promotion is tainted, then they may simply dread the whole process because it is so unnatural for them and doesn’t mesh with their sensibilities. Their focus and training is on creating art, so promoting it seems like an intrusion and an endeavor for which they are wholly unprepared. This attitude assumes that art and promotion are totally distinct activities, functioning practically independent of one another.

Inherent in this view is the idea that specialists are best suited for the respective roles of artist and promoter. Yet artists who are not established rarely have the luxury of being able to completely entrust all of their promotional needs to a specialist. So, if an artist does not promote him/herself then this necessary task will go undone, in which case it is likely that the work, no matter how good it is, will not find an audience. Artists must “get their hands dirty” and lay some of the groundwork required for initiating their own careers.

Copyright © 2009 by Adam Eisenstat

Adam Eisenstat is a professional writer with extensive experience writing for artists (artist statements, bios, grant essays, etc.). To learn more about how Adam can help you create powerful written communications that will advance your work, contact him at: adameisenstat@aol.com or visit his online portfolio at www.mediabistro.com/AdamEisenstat.

Adam Eisenstat

917.282.8949

adameisenstat@aol.com

21 powerful ways to motivate yourself when you’re in a Slump

We’ve all been there…

If you’re in a slump right now, you know what I mean.

You might have goals and dreams, but right now, they
seem like a distant fantasy–unimportant and detached
from reality.

So what do you do? If you’re like most people, you take
a break from all of your projects and aspirations. And
you spend some time feeling depressed and indifferent
to progress.

http://aureliustjin.com/21-powerful-ways-to-motivate-yourself-when-youre-in-a-slump

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